DePaul Law News

  • Student Spotlight

    DePaul Law student recieves Prettyman Fellowship

    First DePaul Law student to receive honor, Fadya Salem is "beyond excited" to become a Prettyman Fellow 

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  • Faculty Spotlight

    Professor Wendy Epstein named 2016 Health Law Scholar for work-in-progress "Price Transparency and Incomplete Contracts in Health Care"

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  • Alumni Spotlight

    Alumnus Don Schiller and DePaul's Schiller DuCanto & Fleck Family Law Center featured in Chicago Daily Law Bulletin

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Health Law Ranking

The DePaul College of Law’s health law program ranks 15th in the nation according to the recent U.S. News & World Report law school specialty rankings. “I am proud of the important work that our faculty, students, alumni, and community partners are doing at the forefront of health law and policy. There is no more important time than the present to be engaged in the difficult issues that face our health care system,” said Wendy Netter Epstein, Faculty Director of the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute

Students of the health law program at DePaul College of Law not only have access to a broad health law curriculum that spans the field, but also may obtain a certificate in health law, an LLM, or a masters of jurisprudence in health law or health care compliance. Students are mentored by prominent practitioners in the field, and many participate in the Jaharis Summer Scholars program, where they obtain paid summer positions at some of the most distinguished law firms and health organizations in Chicago. Most recently, the Institute, together with the DePaul Journal of Health Care Law, the nationally ranked Center for Intellectual Property Law & Information Technology, and the DePaul Journal of Art, Technology, and Information Technology, held its annual Symposium, “Telehealth: Transforming the Healthcare Delivery Landscape.” 

The health law program has an accomplished faculty teaching and writing in a broad range of health-related areas including price transparency, incentive pay, disability discrimination, intellectual property licensing of pharmaceuticals, federal regulation of medical devices, and informed consent in medical research. With the generous support of a $5 million endowment from the Jaharis Family Foundation, the Institute has recently expanded to include a faculty fellow to teach and write on topics at the increasingly important intersection of health law and intellectual property. 

DePaul’s health law program is always innovating, keeping ahead of the dynamic nature of the field. If you are interested in learning more about the program, please contact Executive Director Katherine Schostok​.

Remembering Michael Jaharis (JD '58)

Michael Jaharis (JD ’58)
Michael Jaharis (JD ’58)
The Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute at DePaul University College of Law would like to remember Michael Jaharis (JD ’58) on the one year anniversary of his passing in February of 2016. Mr. Jaharis, a graduate of DePaul University College of Law, was the founder of several pharmaceutical companies. He and his wife, Mary, have generously supported the students, faculty, and programs at the College of Law.

In 2015, a $5 million endowment established by the Jaharis Family Foundation Inc. was donated to the College of Law to expand and strengthen scholarly and educational programs at the dynamic intersection of health law and intellectual property law. Mr. Jaharis’s generous endowment has funded the Journal of Health Care Law’s yearly symposium, summer externship programs for law students committed to practicing intellectual property and health law, and the addition of a faculty fellow who focuses on teaching and research at the intersection of health law and intellectual property, among others. In recognition of the Jaharis Family’s support, the Health Law Institute was renamed the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute.

The Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute is grateful to Mr. Jaharis, and will continue to promote his passion of health law and intellectual property law through its curricula and research.​​​

JHLI executive director Schostok quoted in 'InBusiness' magazine

Katherine Schostok, executive director of DePaul University College of Law's Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute, was recently quoted by InBusiness magazine. The article, 'Can alternative medicine lower costs?', examines the potential health and financial benefits to, as well as the arguments against, expanding insurance to cover complementary and alternative medicine. DePaul Law's Journal of Health Care Law is among those groups advocating for greater funding into evidence-based research in determining the efficacy of alternative treatments, which include chiropractic, acupuncture and massage therapies.

According to Schostok, "There is definitely a push to do more studies to look at these alternative kinds of medicines, but right now it's pretty limited." Among the journal's recommendations are allowing the Affordable Care Act to reimburse for evidence-based alternative treatments, enabling the the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health to determine standards of success and combining intellectual property protection and government awards for proven alternative treatments.


preLaw magazine gives DePaul's public interest and health law programs high marks

DePaul University College of Law's public interest law and health law programs each received high marks from from preLaw magazine in the 2016 Back to School issue​. The periodical ranks law schools that are dedicated to innovation and provide exceptional offerings in key areas. DePaul was one of only five schools to receive an A+ rating, the magazine's highest grade, in public interest law, while its health program garnered an A-.

The public interest law program offers students myriad opportunities for professional growth with a focus on social justice issues. Among its most notable programs are the DePaul Journal for Social Justice, a first-year legal writing section dedicated to public interest law, summer job placements, and numerous pro bono and volunteer opportunities. 

Shaye Loughlin, the executive director of the Center for Public Interest Law, was "thrilled to learn about our public interest grade by preLaw magazine." She said Professor Emeritus Leonard Cavise, the founding faculty director of the center, recognized how the public interest law program reflects the university's Vincentian philosophy to aid the poor and vulnerable in our communities. “The preLaw grade recognizes the strength of our public interest law training program and our committed community of social justice advocates,” continued Loughlin.

For more than 30 years, DePaul's health law program has been on the forefront of health law education, research and scholarship. The health law curriculum offers a wide range of coursework in traditional, face-to-face classes, online classes, fieldwork and other experiential offerings. Courses cover diverse areas including regulatory, corporate compliance, policy, social and ethical issues. 

Through the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute (JHLI), students also have numerous opportunities to expand their potential in the health law field through a fellowship program, summer job placements and moot court competitions. Executive Director Katherine Schostok and Faculty Director Wendy Epstein oversee the JHLI programs.​


Professor Wendy Epstein named a 2016 health law scholar

2016 Health Law Scholars
Wendy Epstein (middle) pictured with fellow 2016 Health Law Scholars - Elizabeth McCuskey of University of Toledo College of Law (left), and Rachel Sachs of Washington University in St. Louis School of Law (right).

The American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics and Saint Louis University School of Law recently named DePaul Associate Professor Wendy Epstein a 2016 Health Law Scholar for her work-in-progress “Price Transparency and Incomplete Contracts in Health Care.”

The Health Law Scholars Workshop recognizes the achievements of junior faculty in health law and bioethics. Each year, health law professors choose four exceptional works from emerging scholars in these fields. The honorees are invited to Saint Louis University Law School in September to present their pieces to a gathering of health law scholars, who will provide feedback and guidance on the thesis. Many participants subsequently get their articles published in notable law journals. Epstein's fellow scholars are Rachel Sachs of Washington University in St. Louis School of Law, Elizabeth McCuskey of University of Toledo College of Law, and Jasmine Harris of UC Davis School of Law.

Epstein's “Price Transparency” analyzes the issues with the use of open price term contracts for medical services. Currently, the law permits patients to consent to medical procedures without knowing how much they will cost, which often causes the patient to incur significant fees and possible debt. In the article, Epstein argues in favor of the use of “patient-provider” contracts. Since, with rare exception (e.g. emergency care, complicated surgeries), medical providers can readily reveal pricing information, both parties would be better served with this openness.

In addition to “Price Transparency,” Epstein has had articles featured in numerous journals. The Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics is set to publish her “Revisiting Incentive-Based Contracts” in a 2017 edition. Other recent publications include “Facilitating Incomplete Contracts” (65 Case W. Res. L. Rev. 297 (2015)), “Contract Theory and the Failures of Public-Private Contracting” (34 Cardozo L. Rev. 2211 (2013)), and “Public-Private Contracting and the Reciprocity Norm” (the lead article in 64 Am. U. L. Rev. 1 (2014)). Her scholarship can be found on her SSRN page.

Epstein has been a member of DePaul’s College of Law faculty since 2013. She currently teaches Contracts and Health Care Law and is faculty director of the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute.

 


Jaharis Faculty Fellow focuses research on biopharma IP negotiations in pandemic outbreaks

Ana Santos Rutschman
Ana Santos Rutschman is DePaul's 2016-2017 Jaharis Faculty Fellow.
DePaul University College of Law has named Ana Santos Rutschman the Jaharis Faculty Fellow for academic year 2016-2017. Rutschman will be conducting cutting-edge research at the intersection of health law and intellectual property, specifically related to the negotiation of intellectual property licensing in the biopharmaceutical industry during pandemic disease outbreaks.

Rutschman, an SJD candidate at Duke University School of Law, is currently finishing a project with the World Health Organization (WHO) that charts the licensing of intellectual property and its effect on the response to the outbreaks of the Ebola and Zika viruses in 2014 and 2015. Her research evaluates the global response, but in particular maps the European and American reaction times and systems. She explains that organizations, like the WHO, are beginning to look at how intellectual property negotiations can be streamlined to allow for faster development and deployment of medical treatments during such outbreaks.

“The area of IP negotiations is still underexplored, especially in terms of what are best practices in emergency responses,” said Rutschman. “Much could be avoided if we had better blueprints for negotiations in pandemic outbreaks like [Ebola]. The biopharmaceutical industry traditionally acts very slowly; it generally takes at least 10 years to develop a vaccine. ... It’s unfortunate that IP could stand in the way for vaccines already in the pipeline when an emergency happens, like the Zika and Ebola outbreaks.”

Rutschman discovered that, with Ebola, vaccines were eventually passed through the system before licensing was completely finalized. “If we can agree in advance on a set of provisions related to IP, then we can move ahead with those contracts or agreements after the vaccines have been pushed through the pipeline to help address emergency situations.”

During the course of her research on the response to the Ebola outbreak, Rutschman talked to many different organizations, some of which were not yet looking at Ebola as a case study on the interplay between intellectual property and global responses to pandemic outbreaks. Then, the Zika outbreak began. She explained that some of the same organizations “rushed to map out previous alliances based on the Ebola responses. ... Behaviors changed a lot. That was certainly some of the most fascinating part of my work.”

In addition to her research, Rutschman will teach a seminar on health innovation and intellectual property and a course on food and drug law at DePaul. She also will work closely with the Jaharis Health Law Institute and the Center for Intellectual Property Law & Information Technology. She begins the one-year fellowship on July 1.

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Wolters Kluwer’s expert discusses use of social media in health care

Writer/analyst Melissa Mitchell (JD ’09) with Wolters Kluwer’s health law editorial team presented “#healthcare: The Promise and Pitfalls of Using Social Media to Enhance Health Care” at DePaul's College of Law on April 12, 2016. Her lecture explored how social media functions from a health care consumer standpoint, and was the final in a series hosted by the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute during academic year 2015-2016. 

Mitchell addressed how health care providers may take advantage of the opportunities presented by social media while avoiding the pitfalls of its use and overuse. The lecture delved into how social media can enhance knowledge and the spread of information on both the consumer and the provider sides. Mitchell discussed how the use of social media can make the delivery of health care more complicated and dangerous, as well as how providers can get into hot water when the use of social media in their organizations goes awry. 

For more information or to be added to the JHLI email list, please contact Kathryn Brown or Sarah Balas. 


Health law symposium explores technological advances and big data

DePaul's 2016 health law symposium featured practitioners, technological experts and other professionals working together in the health care sector and using technological advances to improve upon traditional practices. "The New Frontier of Health Innovation: Navigating the Regulatory Landscape" offered insights from individuals navigating an increasingly complex set of statutory and administrative rules and the legal practitioners that aid their efforts.

"In many ways, this is a lecture we couldn’t have given two to three years ago," said Dr. Raj Shah, principle investigator at the Chicago Area Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Network and associate professor of family medicine at Rush University Hospital. Shah led the panel discussion, "Protecting Information in the Face of Innovation: Precision Medicine and the Population Health Research in Health Systems." Shah provided a brief history of health care security regulation, including complications with the HIPAA Privacy Rule and HITECH, and presented current tensions needing resolution. He described evolutionary steps toward acquiring more data, such as contractual agreements to enable efficient and value added data flows for research, institutional collaboration and data repositories at institutions. In addition, he discussed the balance between data privacy and protecting commons.

Other panels discussed legal and regulatory considerations, ethics in healthcare technology and the impact of gender and sex on innovation and health technology. 

"The symposium provided DePaul a terrific opportunity to bring together health care innovators with lawyers and regulators to discuss both the potential and the challenges that technological advances and the use of big data bring to the field," said Associate Professor Wendy Netter Epstein, faculty director of the Jaharis Health Law Institute (JHLI). "This sort of collaboration among key industry players is central to the mission of the institute."

The symposium was presented by the DePaul Journal of Health Care Law,  the JHLI, the Center for Intellectual Property Law & Information Technology, and the DePaul Journal of Art, Technology & Intellectual Property. 


DePaul takes second at Maryland health law compliance competition

JHLI moot court team members Anthony Lopez, Lana Smith and Lauren Masching.
DePaul University College of Law's Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute (JHLI) moot court team placed second in the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law Health Law Regulatory & Compliance Competition. Team members included third-year student Lana Smith and second-year students Lauren Masching and Anthony Lopez, who are all health law fellows at JHLI.

"We are extremely proud of our moot court team who placed second at the University of Maryland competition," said moot court team supervisor and health law institute executive director Katherine Schostok. "They gained invaluable experience and knowledge in the compliance and regulatory field."

At the competition, the team analyzed a hypothetical problem for potential compliance and regulatory issues. The students worked together to answer a variety of issues facing a hospital system that included the Anti-Kickback Statute, the Stark Law, the False Claims Act, employment matters and corporate structuring of a hospital system. After a brief research period, teams presented two 20-minute presentations, one as counsel for the Food and Drug Administration and the other as outside counsel for the hospital system. This was the second time the Jaharis Health Law Institute has competed at the regulatory and compliance competition. 

"We were nervous leading up to the distribution of the problem, but once we evaluated the issues we gained our confidence back," said Lana Smith. "The health law classes we've taken at DePaul, especially Professor Schostok's Healthcare Fraud and Abuse course, gave us the research skills and knowledge to tackle the problem, as well as the ability to comfortably discuss our recommendations.

"After the presentations, we received positive feedback, but it was a wonderful surprise to hear we placed second out of the teams who competed. It was an incredible feeling to be able to represent the Jaharis Health Law Institute and DePaul." 


Navigating a path to health law: Samantha Grund-Wickramasekera

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The daughter of a Chicago nurse, second-year law student Samantha Grund-Wickramasekera (BA ’14) has always had the public interest at the back of her mind.

As an undergrad at DePaul University, she double-majored in political science and women’s & gender studies, with a minor in LGBTQ studies. She also worked as a legal intern for Chicago’s Domestic Violence Legal Clinic. Although Grund-Wickramasekera enrolled in law school with a focus on public interest law, her work at Ohio Northern University’s Pre-Law Undergraduate Scholars Program indicated a natural grasp of intellectual property law (her exam scores were the highest in the class). 

As someone with many interests, Grund-Wickramasekera spent her last two years of undergraduate school, as well as her first year of law school, working at real estate, business law and estate planning firm, Spencer & Rozwadowski. At DePaul she gravitated to both the Center for Intellectual Property Law & Information Technology (CIPLIT®) and the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute (JHLI)​With three years' experience in real estate and  nearly a year of legal coursework behind her, she decided to pinpoint her passion beyond the classroom. This past summer, Grund-Wickramasekera secured an internship at the Chicago Field Museum of Natural History’s Office of General Counsel and an externship as a law clerk at the Illinois Department of Healthcare and Family Services, Bureau of Administrative Hearings.

As she navigated her path through her work experiences, Grund-Wickramasekera felt the constant and strong support of the faculty. She credits CIPLIT for the Field Museum internship tip: “CIPLIT Director Ellen Gutiontov was active the entire year making sure we had something lined up for the summer.” Grund-Wickramasekera also found a fellow Double Demon in her supervisor, Office of General Counsel attorney Sarah Ebel (JD ’14, BA ’05). 

Grund-Wickramasekera’s role at the Field Museum involved contract reviewing, copyright issues and work with the Americans with Disabilities Act, which she found particularly captivating. “I was interested in the way museums are fulfilling the objectives and regulations stipulated in that law,” she detailed, “but also spearheading the way toward total inclusivity at museums, given that their academic missions are to open education to as many people as possible.”

Grund-Wickramasekera said her interest in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) led her to the Department of Healthcare and Family Services, the government agency that oversees the distribution of Medicaid benefits, as well as child support.

“When the agencies underneath the Department of Healthcare and Family Services make decisions, such as denying requests for additional funding for children with disabilities, the family has the opportunity to appeal the denial all the way up to our agency, where the agency reviews whether a lower agency made the proper determination in light of the evidence available,” she explained. At the Department of Healthcare and Family Services, she worked under various hearing officers and administrative law judges who oversaw these hearings. She also wrote numerous final administrative decisions (FADs) and was able to further educate herself on the ACA, Medicare and Medicaid through lectures and attendance at the Chicago Bar Association events.

Ultimately, she reached her own verdict. “I realized I loved government and healthcare-related work and decided this was the field I wanted to pursue,” she said. “There is a huge human element to the practice of health law that makes it less abstract than other areas of law and makes me feel as if my work can still make a difference in someone’s life.” She cites JHLI Faculty Director Wendy Netter Epstein as a sounding board for jobs and direction in health law. Following Netter Epstein’s promotion of the Health Law Institute, Grund-Wickramasekera joined as a Health Law Fellow.

“The Health Law Institute really fuses together things I’ve learned from my undergrad—public policy issues, minority access to healthcare—but combines it in a way that brings together my first-year law courses, such as contracts, civil procedure and constitutional law, all classes which I excelled at during the first year.”

Though offered a continuing externship position with the Department of Healthcare and Family Services throughout the fall, Grund-Wickramasekera is choosing to invest her time as a member of DePaul’s Journal of Health Care Law and the Appellate Moot Court Society. More recently, Grund-Wickramasekera secured a judicial externship position with the Honorable Sara L. Ellis, United States District Court Judge for the Northern District of Illinois.

She aims to use the skills learned from these activities in pursuit of a healthcare litigation-based career. As for her hectic summer schedule, she accepts it as the nature of the field. “The law is constantly a learning profession—there were changes and updates that my supervisors were also learning,” she commented. “If you have a grasp of the foundational principles, that’s good; but even then, those skills are put to the task in the summer. I’d say there’s still obviously a lot left to learn, but I am so excited to keep learning and following my passions in my field of choice at the same time.”

Crafting a career in health law: Tobin Klusty

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F​​irsthand experience never hurts, especially when it comes to crafting your legal career.

Just ask second-year student Tobin Klusty. Fresh from an American Medical Association Ethics Department Scholar position this past summer, the promising second-year student is embracing the intersection of health care and civil rights.

A graduate of Michigan State University, Klusty came to DePaul University College of Law for its location and deep alumni network. “Chicago is full of practicing attorneys, and has a very large professional network. DePaul’s large group of alumni enhances my ability to make important connections, which will aid my career search,” he said.

Klusty credits Legal Writing Instructor Allison Ortlieb, Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute​ (JHLI) Executive Director Katherine Schostok and JHLI Faculty Director Wendy Netter Epstein with guiding his journey at DePaul. His specific academic journey focuses on litigation, but he is also interested in pursuing policy and trial advocacy.

“I am attracted to litigation due to its competitive atmosphere and complex argumentative nature. I am also attracted to policy because of its wide impact on the 
community,” he said. “Within litigation and policy,” he added, “I am most interested in health law and civil rights, specifically how health law impacts civil rights.”

“Professor Ortlieb has been an outstanding role model, being a reliable source of professional advice and helping me craft my legal writing skills. Professor Schostok has guided me through my quest as a fellow of the Jaharis Health Law Institute, and recommended me for the [American Medical Association] Ethics Scholar position.

Lastly, but certainly not least,” he continued, “Professor Epstein has been an exceptional mentor, and has expanded my knowledge of the U.S. health care system through my research assistant position for her upcoming literature-review manuscript on health care compensation models.”

Health law is a very interesting and expanding field that has a high demand for competent young attorneys,” Klusty said. “The application of health law also has strong influence on civil rights, namely the opportunity for minority groups to access affordable and adequate health care.” Klusty added that his dream job would be a litigator for the Office of General Counsel for the Department of Health and Human Services, and he seems to have found his footing along the right path.

As the AMA’s Ethics Department Scholar this past summer, Klusty said he was able to see how a self-regulating organization conducts itself in practice and he learned the importance of wording when it comes to policy. As such, Klusty developed a strong interest in working with policy.

Among the projects Klusty contributed to as an AMA Ethics Department Scholar include researching legal implications of the AMA’s Code of Medical Ethics; drafting the Reference Committee on Amendments to Constitution and Bylaws Report during the AMA’s annual policy meeting; coproducing the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs Report in conjunction with Ethics Policy staff; preparing detailed summaries about the legal and ethical issues of “responsible physician prescribing, the relationship between pregnancy and advance directives, and informed consent regarding medical research”; and authoring and coauthoring several articles on pivotal cases in health law and topics at the intersection of health law, medicine and bioethics for the AMA Journal of Ethics.

Klusty’s time spent with the AMA helped him develop his ability to write for a publication under a short deadline while focusing on conducting thorough research. He also was able to observe the judicial function of the AMA’s Office of General Counsel and the Council of Ethical and Judicial Affairs. This experience helped refine his career vision, giving him a much clearer understanding of what he wants his career path to be and how he will achieve his professional goals with the support of DePaul Law’s faculty, staff and alumni along the way.

Health law symposium explores "designer genes"

In March more than 75 people attended the DePaul Journal of Health Care Law and the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute’s symposium, “Designer Genes: The Cost of Genetic Information.”

Professors Wendy Epstein and Joshua Sarnoff moderated the discussion on governmental and private collection of genetic material and the legal implications surrounding the topic. Speakers represented the fields of medicine, economics, ethics and the law, with panelists focusing their talks on the intersection of intellectual property, economics, and the collection of genetic information. Participants weighed the benefits of new genetic-gathering capabilities against patients’ rights and ethical concerns surrounding commercial uses of the information. 

Speakers discussed the state of gene patenting in light of the recent Supreme Court decision in Myriad, where the Supreme Court found that products of nature, such as a naturally occurring DNA segment, are not patent eligible merely because they have been isolated. The symposium also shed light on the fair trade and patent issues that typically attach to medical devices and the ethical concerns surrounding personalized medicine.​

Innovation in legal studies: $5 million endowment supports health law and intellectual property programs

A new endowment at DePaul University College of Law will expand and strengthen scholarly and educational programs at a dynamic intersection of legal studies— intellectual property and health law. 

The $5 million endowment established by the Jaharis Family Foundation Inc. will create an endowed directorship for the college’s Health Law Institute; support a competitive internship program for up to 20 students committed to practicing intellectual property and health law; and fund a faculty fellowship program for scholars to create and disseminate research and curricula in these areas.

Michael Jaharis (JD ’58) is the founder of several pharmaceutical companies. For decades, he and his wife Mary have generously supported students and programs at the College of Law. In recognition of their support, the Health Law Institute has been renamed the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute (JHLI). DePaul’s intellectual property and health law programs are nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report. 

As discoveries and innovations in fields such as genomics, nanotechnology and pharmaceuticals have accelerated, intellectual property challenges have created a demand for lawyers with credentials and expertise across these areas. The endowment will support the addition of curricula and research into interdisciplinary issues such as the law and economics of drug development for impoverished groups of afflicted individuals and the nexus of patent law, pharmaceutical regulation and international importation.

Assistant Professor Wendy Netter Epstein was appointed the first Jaharis Faculty Fellow and recently was named faculty director of the JHLI. Epstein, whose work has appeared in Cardozo University Law Review, American University Law Review and Case Western Reserve Law Review, has worked on curricular advances in intellectual property and health law for the College of Law and in partnership with Rush University Medical Center and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science.

“As advances in medicine are brought to market, the interaction of health law and intellectual property will become more and more important to all of us,” said the Rev. Dennis H. Holtschneider, C.M., president of DePaul University. “The new endowment will promote academic excellence and leadership in those important and dynamic fields.”

Jaharis Health Law Institute: Facts & Figures

Mission: The Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute (JHLI), first established as the Health Law Institute in 1984, responds to contemporary ethical, legal and moral challenges in the health care field through systematic, innovate approaches that influence policy development.
Leadership: The JHLI is managed by a faculty director and an executive director, and receives guidance and support from a 15-member advisory board and a 10-member student board.

Wendy Netter Epstein, Faculty Director
Katherine V. Schostok, Executive Director

Health Law Summer Scholars: In summer 2015, eight students will serve as summer scholars in prestigious health law placements throughout the Chicago area. 

Gloria Crawford, Rush University Medical Center
Luci Doler, Baxter International
Tobin Klusty, American Medical Association, Council on Ethics and Judicial Affairs
Nesko Radovic, Presence Health
Lacey Rogers, Walgreens Co.
Asik Shaa, American Medical Association, Office of the General Counsel
Leah Sibbio, Husch Blackwell
Andrea Torgrimson, Accretive Health

Student Competitions: The JHLI annually sponsors two teams to compete in the L. Edward Bryant Jr. National Health Law Transactional Moot Court Competition at Loyola University Chicago. It also sponsors a team for the Health Law Regulatory & Compliance Competition at the University of Maryland.

Lectures and Symposia: The JHLI hosts an annual symposium, bringing together leaders in academia and legal and health care fields. The 2015 symposium topic was “Designer Genes: The Cost of Genetic Information.”

Jaharis investment supports DePaul College of Law programs in intellectual property and health law

A new endowment at DePaul University College of Law will expand and strengthen scholarly and educational programs in an area where two dynamic legal fields are increasingly intersecting — intellectual property and health law.

The Jaharis Family Foundation, Inc., is establishing an endowment in the College of Law to support programs in intellectual property and health law. For decades, DePaul alumnus Michael Jaharis and his wife Mary have generously supported students and programs at the college. In recognition of their support, the Health Law Institute will be re-named the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute.
The $5 million endowment established by the Jaharis Family Foundation, Inc., will create an endowed directorship for the college’s Health Law Institute; fund a faculty fellowship program for scholars to create and disseminate scholarship and curricula at the intersection of intellectual property and health law; and support a competitive internship program for up to 20 student scholars committed to practicing intellectual property and health law.

DePaul’s intellectual property and health law programs are nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report. The specialty programs are supported by the work of the Center for Intellectual Property Law & Information Technology and the Health Law Institute. As discoveries and innovations in fields such as genomics, nanotechnology and pharmaceuticals have accelerated, intellectual property challenges and issues have created a demand for lawyers with credentials and expertise across these areas.

The endowment will support the addition of curricula and research into interdisciplinary issues such as the law and economics of drug development for impoverished groups of afflicted individuals, and the nexus between patent law, pharmaceutical regulation and cross-border importation.

Michael Jaharis, a graduate of DePaul’s College of Law (’58), is the founder of several pharmaceutical companies. For decades, his wife Mary and he have generously supported students and programs at DePaul University’s College of Law. In recognition of their support, the Health Law Institute will be re-named the Mary and Michael Jaharis Health Law Institute.

Professor Wendy Netter Epstein recently was appointed the College of Law Jaharis Faculty Fellow. Epstein, who is a faculty leader of DePaul’s Health Law Institute, has worked on curricular advances in these important fields for the College of Law and in partnership with Rush University Medical Center and Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science.

She also has developed a health law colloquium to promote discussion between students and scholars on a range of modern issues in health law. Epstein’s research and scholarship focuses on contracts and health care law, using an interdisciplinary approach to bridge the divide between theory and practice. Her work most recently has appeared or is forthcoming in Cardozo University Law Review, American University Law Review and Case Western Reserve Law Review.

“As advances in medicine are brought to market, the interaction of health law and intellectual property will become more and more important to all of us,” said the Rev. Dennis H. Holtschneider, C.M., president of DePaul University. “The new endowment will promote academic excellence and leadership in those important and dynamic fields.”

Media Contact:
Carol Hughes, chughe23@depaul.edu
(312) 362-8592 desk | (312) 608-2206 cell


DePaul and Loyola launch Chicago Health Law Colloquium

DePaul University College of Law and Loyola University Chicago School of Law will sponsor the first annual Chicago Health Law Colloquium beginning in the spring 2015 semester. DePaul and Loyola have invited six nationally renowned health law scholars to Chicago to present and discuss their current research projects. Colloquium participants will include health law faculty from Chicago-area schools and prominent health law practitioners, as well as DePaul and Loyola students selected as Chicago Health Law Colloquium Fellows.

The colloquium offers students an opportunity to advance their understanding of cutting-edge topics in the areas of health law and bioethics in a forum that goes beyond traditional classroom-based learning, bringing together Chicago’s educational and professional communities.

Spring 2015 Chicago Health Law Colloqium Scholars and Topics:

  • Michael Frakes
    Associate Professor, Northwestern University School of Law
    “The Surprising Relevance of Medical Malpractice Law” 
  • Ralph Hall
    Professor of the Practice, University of Minnesota School of Law
    “Role and Regulation of Registries and Big Data”
  • Diana Hyman Winter
    Associate Professor and Dean’s Fellow, Indiana University McKinney School of Law
    “Primary Jurisdiction and the FDA”
  • Thaddeus Pope
    Associate Professor, Director of Health Law Institute, Hamline University School of Law
    “Titrating Due Process for the Most Vulnerable: Medical Decision Making for ​Incapacitated Patients without Surrogates”
  • Valerie Gutmann Koch
    Visiting Assistant Professor, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law
    “A Private Right of Action for Informed Consent in Research”
  • I. Glenn Cohen
    Assistant Professor, Co-Director of Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics, Harvard Law School
    “Are All Abortions Equal? Rape, Incest, and Abortion”

DePaul Professor Wendy Netter Epstein and Loyola Visiting Professor Eleanor D. Kinney are the lead faculty for the colloquium. Up to eights students will be chosen for Colloqium Fellowships. Students interested in applying must submit a Chicago Health Law Colloquium Application by November 10.


National Law Journal readers rank DePaul law programs best in Chicago

DePaul University College of Law took top honors in several categories in the National Law Journal's (NLJ) Best of Chicago reader rankings for 2014.

DePaul placed first for Best LLM Program and Best Law School Clinical Program in Chicago. 

The College of Law offers four LLM programs and seven clinical programs. LLM programs focus on the areas of health law, intellectual property law, international law and taxation. DePaul's clinical programs include the Asylum & Immigration Law Clinic, Civil Rights Clinic, Criminal Appeals Clinic, Family Law Clinic, Housing & Community Development Legal Clinic, Misdemeanor Clinic and Poverty Law Clinic. The legal clinics also received NLJ Best of Chicago honors in 2012.

DePaul took third place in two other survey categories: Best Overall JD Program and Best Joint JD/MBA Program.

More than 1,200 readers voted in this year's NLJ reader’s choice survey.


Center for Public Interest Law hosts discussion about Cook County response to human trafficking

The Center for Public Interest Law hosted a panel discussion to highlight the work of advocates on the Cook County Human Trafficking Taskforce on March 19.

Panelists Catherine Longkumer of the Legal Aid Society of Metropolitan Family Services, Angelica Lopez of the DePaul Legal Clinic, and Rachel Ostergaard of the Salvation Army's STOP-IT program defined human trafficking, discussed common stories of their clients, highlighted strategies to stop human trafficking, and explained the unique legal needs and remedies available to foreign-born and domestic survivors of trafficking. Remedies range from immigration benefits to foreign-born survivors who aid in the investigation of human trafficking to a civil cause of action for survivors against their trafficker under the Illinois Predator Accountability Act. Students were given insight into how advocates in Cook County are working together to respond to this human rights issue and how legal and social services are critical to help survivors of trafficking.

The event was co-sponsored by the International Law Society, the Society for Asylum and Immigration Law, and the Latino Law Student Association.


Alumna Jennifer Cassel featured in DePaul's 14 Under 40

DePaul Magazine recently showcased 14 distinguished DePaul alumni who are making the difference in the lives of others in its eighth annual edition of 14 Under 40.

Included on the list is DePaul law alumni Jennifer Cassell (JD ’08), assistant regional counsel for the Office of the General Counsel at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She reflects upon how her DePaul experiences, including hands-on efforts to help residents of New Orleans post-Hurricane Katrina, influenced her career. Read her story.