DePaul University College of Law > Faculty & Staff > Faculty A-Z > Allison Brownell Tirres

Allison Brownell Tirres

  • atirres@depaul.edu
  • Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Associate Professor of Law
  • Full-time
  • (312) 362-8116
  • 931 Lewis Center
Professor Tirres joined the College of Law faculty in 2007. She received a bachelor's degree magna cum laude from Princeton University in 1996 and then studied for a year in Mexico City at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. In 2004, Professor Tirres received her JD from Harvard Law School, where she was an editor and treasurer of the Harvard Law Review. In 2008, she received a PhD in history from Harvard University. She was the first Cleary, Gottlieb, Hamilton & Steen fellow at the Harvard Immigration & Refugee Clinic of Greater Boston Legal Services. Professor Tirres also worked for the Immigration Project of the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law of Texas and for the law firm of Baker, Donelson, Bearman & Caldwell in Memphis, Tennessee. Professor Tirres' research and publications focus on immigration, citizenship and property law in both historical and contemporary perspectives. Her work has appeared in the American Journal of Legal History, the Georgetown Immigration Law Journal and the Michigan Journal of Race & Law, among others. In 2011, she was invited by the U.S. State Department to travel to Greece to serve as an expert speaker on issues of immigration law, policy and history. She is a contributing editor of the online legal scholarship journal Jotwell, a guest blogger for the Legal History Blog, and a reviewer for the journal Law & Social Inquiry.

Education

BA, Princeton University; MA (History), JD and PhD (History), Harvard University

Areas of Expertise

Immigration Law

Courses Taught

  • Property
  • Legal History
  • Immigration Law & Policy

Publications

  • Articles
  • Book Chapters
  • Book Reviews
  • Miscellaneous

Articles

2017 Latinos and the Law, American History: Oxford Research Encyclopedias (forthcoming 2017). string;#
2013 Property Outliers: Non-Citizens, Property Rights and State Power, 27 Geo. Immigr. L.J. 77 (2013) string;#Click Here
2013 Mercy in Immigration Law, 2013 BYU L. Rev. 1563 (Symposium Issue, 2014) string;#Click Here
2013 Ownership without Citizenship: The Creation of Noncitizen Property Rights, 19 Mich. J. Race & L. 1 (2013) string;#Click Here
2009 Lawyers and Legal Borderlands, 50 Am. J. Legal Hist. 157 (2008-2010). string;#Click Here
2004 Note, Law, Race, and the Border: The El Paso Salt War of 1877, 117 Harv. L. Rev. 941 (2004). string;#Click Here

Book Chapters

2013 Who Belongs? Immigrants and the Law in American History, in A Companion to American Legal History (eds S. E. Hadden and A. L. Brophy, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK., 2013). string;#
2012 Bordered Lands: Legal Culture and Land Use in the Nineteenth-Century Southwest, in Community, Home, and Identity (R.P. Malloy & T. Turnipseed eds., Ashgate Press, forthcoming 2012) string;#
2010 The View from the Border: Law and Community in the Nineteenth Century, in Transformations in American Legal History, vol. 2 (ed. Daniel W. Hamilton & Alfred Brophy) (Harvard University Press, 2011). string;#Click Here

Book Reviews

2012 Book Review, 30 Law & Hist. Rev. 1193 (2012) (reviewing Rachel St. John, Line in the Sand: A History of the Western U.S.-Mexico Border (2011)) string;#
2011 Book Review, 29 Law & Hist. Rev. 647 (2011) (reviewing Kelly Lytle Hernandez: Migra! A History of the U.S. Border Patrol (2010)) string;#Click Here
2010 Book Review, 28 Law & Hist. Rev. 280 (2010) (reviewing Joseph P. Sánchez, Between Two Rivers: The Atrisco Land Grant in Albuquerque History 1692-1968 (2008)). string;#Click Here
2009 Book Review, 23 Continuity & Change: J. of Soc. Structure, L. & Demography in Past Societies 531 (2008) (reviewing Laura Gomez, Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican American Race (2007)). string;#
2006 Book Review, H-Law, H-Net Reviews, (2006), (reviewing Mary L. Dudziak and Leti Volpp, eds., Legal Borderlands:L Law and Construction of American Borders (2006)). string;#Click Here
2002 Book Note, The Double Edge of Legal Ideals (reviewing William E. Nelson, The Legalist Reformation: Law, Politics, and Ideology in New York, 1920-1980 (2002)), 115 Harv. L. Rev. 1533 (2002). string;#Click Here

Miscellaneous

2014 Book Review, Citizenship by Descent (reviewing Krisin A. Collins, Illegitimate Borders: Jus Sanguinis Citizenship and the Legal Construction of Family, Race and Nation, 123 Yale L. J. 2134 (2014)), Jotwell (2014). string;#Click Here
2013 Book Review, The State Origins of Federal Plenary Power (reviewing Hidetaka Hirota, The Moment of Transition: State Officials, the Federal Government, and the Formation of American Immigration Policy, 99 Journal of American History 1092 (2013).) Jotwell (August 5, 2013) string;#Click Here
2012 Book Review, Is Alabama the New California? Civil Rights Historal through a Multiracial Lens (reviewing Mark Brilliant, The Color of America Has Changed: How Racial Diversity Shaped Civil Rights Reform in California, 1941-1978 (Oxford University Press, 2010)), Jotwell (July 9, 2012) string;#Click Here
2011 Immigration and the Constitution: A New Historical Interpretation , Jotwell (February 28, 2011) string;#Click Here
2008 American Law Comes to the Border: Law and Colonization on the Edge of the U.S./Mexico Divide (Ph.D. Dissertation, Harvard University, 2008). string;#
2004 The Effect of the Great Depression on Latinos, in the Encyclopedia of the Great Depression (Robert S. McElvaine, ed., 2004). string;#