DePaul University College of Law > Academics > Experiential Learning > Legal Clinics > Asylum & Immigration > Courses

Courses

The Asylum and Immigration Law Clinic offers three courses.

  1. All three courses have a classroom component. Class meets once each week to review and discuss reading assignments which cover substantive immigration law issues, lawyering skills such as client interviewing, counseling, legal research, and writing, as well as cultural and language issues that impact the client/lawyer relationship.
  2. All three courses also have a direct service component in which students are responsible for representation of a specific immigration case.
  3. All three courses require you to be responsible for four office hours every week. You will also meet with your supervisor on a weekly basis for an additional hour to review case progress.
  4. Instructor permission is necessary to register all courses.  You will be interviewed before you are given permission to register for the course. Preference will be given to 3rd year day and 4th year evening students, although the course is open to 2nd year day and 3rd year evening students.

Two Semester Asylum and Immigration Clinic Course

  1. Students, working in two-person teams, represent an individual asylum applicant, either before the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, or in immigration court. In this course component, students prepare the application and supporting documents, including a detailed statement from the client applicant, and supporting statements from experts and other witnesses; research human rights conditions and US substantive and procedural law; and develop trial or administrative advocacy strategies. In addition students provide technical assistance to community-based organizations providing immigration services to immigrants. Projects include staff training, legal research and working directly with the clients to prepare applications for remedies under the immigration law.
  2. Clinic students receive 3 credits for the first semester of work and 6 credits for the second semester of work. In general, the time commitment for the asylum work component is heavier during the second semester, as the case advances for trial preparation or for application filing and preparation for an administrative interview before USCIS. Students are expected to work on cases an average of 10-15 hours per week during the first semester and 20-25 hours per week during the second semester.

One Semester Technical Assistance Program (3-credit course)

  1. Students work in teams of two to provide technical assistance to community-based organizations providing immigration legal services to immigrants and refugees. Projects include staff training, legal research, and direct representation of clients seeking various remedies under immigration law.
  2. In general the time commitment for the immigration law one-semester 3-credit course is 10-15 hours per week. The one-semester clinic will be offered in the fall semester.

One Semester Advanced Immigrant Detainee Clinic (3 credit course)

  1. Students work in teams of two to provide quality, direct representation to individuals facing removal proceedings while in the custody of the Department of Homeland Security. Case types include cancellation of removal, adjustment of status with waivers for criminal conduct, and bond hearings.
  2. In general the time commitment for the immigration law one-semester 3-credit course is 10-15 hours per week. This is subject to change depending on the individual case. The one-semester clinic will be offered in the spring semester.
  3. Due to the fast paced nature of detained immigration proceedings, students are required to have taken either the semester long technical assistance clinic or the two-semester asylum and immigration law clinic or show a strong understanding of the Immigration and Nationality Act through extensive prior work experience such as BIA accreditation.
  4. The Advance Immigrant Detainee Clinic will be offered in the spring semester.